A wargames shed is born

13 Mar

Oh dear. I see it’s over four months since I last posted – so not quite the regular updates I expected to make then! I’ve not been idle but, to be honest, as a technophobe, creating a post is a struggle. However, I shall carry on, if only to keep Andy happy.

Andy created this blog and constantly pesters me to post something. He’s one of those computer literate types who knows lots of techie stuff so can’t quite fathom that I still struggle with the function buttons on my wrist watch. He’s particularly haughty with me at the moment because he’s enjoying a bit of a revival of his wargaming mojo (see his sickeningly splendid blog here) but it won’t last and then I’ll get some peace and quiet.

During the meanwhilst I have played a wonderful mid 18thC game in the Loftwaffe (here) and a Great Northern War game with my mate Old John using his amazing 20mm and 1/72 collection.

A small part of John's collection. 20 & 25mm and 1/72. Lead and plastic figures from a multitude of makers and painters.

Our game, and just a small part of John’s GNW collection. 20/25mm and 1/72 lead and plastic figures from a multitude of makers and painters. Marvellous.

I’ve done lots of non wargaming stuff over the winter, like hard landscaping in the garden, but most of all I’ve spent many hours building my work benches, slash, wargames table. They, or rather it, is now finished and I officially have a wargames shed. Ta da!

I have two benches (big bench and little bench). They are robustly constructed but swivel on their casters with the ease of Torvill and Dean on ice. A few pictures follow showing the construction process and end result……….

Six legs per bench: I couldn't source timber of the required so had to glue and screw two 5x2s together. Dowels were inserted so I could screw the casters into the end grain.

Six legs per bench: I couldn’t source timber of the required size so needed to glue and screw two 5x2s together. The dowels allowed me to screw the casters into the end grain.

The legs are built on top of the bottom shelf (yeh, I know, weird). The shelf would transverse support to stop it sagging so I made these up as draws....might as well use the space.

Bracing for the bottom shelf: this stops bowing and keeps the shelf, and therefore the legs, in place. I made the bracing so it could be used as draw space.

Legs, casters and supports in place. Big bench is 5" x 4". Flipping the thing onto its casters was a bit of a worry.

Legs, casters and bracing in place. Big bench is 5′ x 4′ and flipping the thing onto its casters was a bit of a worry.

The second shelf drops over the legs and holds the whole thing rigid and the top sits on top of the legs. It's fixed but it's not structural.

The second shelf drops over the legs and holds the whole thing rigid. The top sits on top of the legs – it is fixed but it’s not really structural.

Reinforcing and twiddly bits were added but that's basically it. Small bench was built the same way.....but being only 5" x 2" was much easier.

Reinforcing and twiddly bits were added but that’s basically it. Little bench was built the same way…..but being only 5′ x 2′ was much easier.

Small bench has a lift up flap which bolts to big bench so they become one. I had intended to fix table top extension to

Little bench has a lift up flap which when required bolts onto big bench so the two become one. I’d intended to fix the playing surface extension to the flap but once in place I was worried about excess weight on the hinges so I thought better of it.

The flap in place against the 5" side of big bench.

The flap in place against the 5′ side of big bench. Top right you can just see the playing surface extension fixed to the wall. When in use, lugs on the flap locate in the extension to stop any lateral movement.

The benches can be arranged in a number of ways. In each position they are bolted together so that the whole structure moves as one…..not that you’d need to move them much I suppose. The photos don’t really give an indication of space round the tables. The largest set-up shown below (8′ x 5′) allows 32″ clear space along each side and 27″ at each end. At a pinch and by using little bench’s flap against big bench’s 4″ side I can have a 9′ x 4’+. I don’t think that would be too cramped. Most of the time little bench will be pushed up against the wall and big bench will be my worktop.

So now I suppose I’d better make some terrain? I’d also like to have a detachable border round the table for when I pay games. Oh crap, still more to do………..

bench-16

6' x 5'

6′ x 5′

7' x 4'+

7′ x 4’+

8' x 5'

8′ x 5′

 

13 thoughts on “A wargames shed is born

  1. That looks very clever Bro, I am impressed and looking forward to seeing more
    I know that you are just about clever enough to write in joined up writing these days but hadn’t realised that you have graduated on top using sharp things and power tools. Best count your fingers now and make sure that you have the same number of fingers as you have toes.

    • I think you do me too much credit, Kerry. I can write all joined up like, but even I can’t interpret wot I has writ. And, I nearly shredded a finger when I groped under a cut to see how close the jigsaw blade was – very, very close was the answer!

  2. What you lack in IT skills you clearly make up for in carpentry, very impressive. As for scenery, it’s all ready for El Alamein!

    • Thank you LT. The benches are best viewed from a distance, but I’m very happy with the end result.

      Although I’m wondering why I bought the sand colour Mat o War!

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